Penis-in-Vagina Sex – What to Expect for Contraceptio

how effective is birth control if he comes inside


Birth control effectiveness varies from person to person. We are not just discussing between methods. Also, are you using it exactly as directed — like to a T?

Don't worry, and take a deep breath. You have options no matter what. You can trust us.

You have 3-5 days to get contraception for an emergency

When you miss a pill, a condom breaks, or you have an unprotected sex, you have a few options for emergency contraception (EC). The window to get it is three to five days.

Two types of contraception are available: EC pills (aka the “morning-after pill”) and copper-based intrauterine devices (IUDs).

The copper IUD is most effective if it’s inserted within 5 days of sex, and it performs equally well on your first day and your fifth.

A single IUD can cost up to $1,300, but many health insurance plans, Medicaid, and other government programs cover them for free or at a low cost.

There are several types of EC pills, each with a different effectiveness in lowering the risk of pregnancy. Since they’re relatively easy to get and use, they’re the most popular solution. With health insurance or Medicaid, there's a chance you can get them for free.

Here's a quick chart

Check out this handy chart to see how effective your birth control is and compare it to other options. Various types of skincare products offer a wide range of efficacy from typical usage to perfect use.


Quick chart
TypeEfficacyProtects against STIs
combination pill91 - 99 percentno
progestin-only pill91 - 99 percentno
hormonal IUDabove 99 percentno
copper IUDabove 99 percentno
implantabove 99 percentno
Depo-Provera shot94 - 99 percentno
patch91 - 99 percentno
NuvaRing91 - 99 percentno
external condom82 - 98 percentyes
internal condom79 - 95 percentyes
diaphragm88 - 96 percentno
cervical cap71 - 96 percentno
sponge76 - 91 percentno
spermicide72Trusted Source - 82 percentTrusted Sourceno
fertility awareness method76 - 99 percentno
pull out/withdrawal78Trusted Source - 96 percent  Sourceno
tubal ligation (sterilization)above 99 percentTrusted Sourceno
vasectomyabove 99 percentTrusted Sourceno

There are different ways to go about it, depending on what you do

Some methods of birth control are more effective than others. None of these methods are 100 percent effective outside of abstinence and a surgical procedure, such as vasectomy or tubal ligation.

Around 95% of women use reversible birth control with hormonal IUDs or implants. Other forms can be almost as effective, but only if they are well executed.

You also need to consider where you are on your cycle.

It can play a role in birth control in a couple of ways.

Let's be clear: It is theoretically possible to become pregnant at any stage of your menstrual cycle, but the chances fluctuate.

You go through your period at the lowest probability and ovulate at the highest probability.

Your cycle also matters when choosing a combined birth control pill. Starting taking them within 5 days after your period starts will give you protection right away. When taking combination pills at any point during your cycle, you must take the pill for 7 days in order to be protected.

Please remember: Perfect usage differs from typical usage.

The only way to reach maximum efficacy in birth control is through the perfect use of the method. The rate of efficacy drops with typical use.

A perfect use scenario is when you follow its instructions reliably, while a typical use scenario is when human error is introduced. In other words: Sh*t happens, and stats are based on average usage.

Only IUDs, implants, and surgical sterilization defy this.

For birth control pills and condoms, two of the most popular contraceptive methods, here are some examples of what perfect use looks like.

If you’re taking the pill

The perfect use is taking the pills every day at approximately the same time (you have a three-hour window!) and making sure you don't take antibiotics or other medications that may cause interference.

Take your pill later than usual and sleep in or forget to take it even once.

If you're a condom user

When using a condom, always apply it exactly as directed on the package, before you touch your cervix.

When you are under duress, do not leave a half-inch space at the tip of the condom, and do not hold the rim tightly to prevent spillage.

Watch for early pregnancy symptoms

When a person doesn't get their period, they often suspect they're pregnant. In early pregnancy, however, there are other symptoms to watch for. It may come on before a missed period.

Watch for these symptoms:

  1. A spotting

  2. swollen, tender breasts

  3. exhaustion

  4. need to pee frequently

  5. food allergies or aversions

  6. Feeling nauseated or ill

When to do a pregnancy test

When you get randy don't hightail it to CVS — a pregnancy test won't detect anything that early.

You need to wait until after your first missed period for the most accurate result. It’s ok if you’re antsy after the incident, but you need to give it a couple of weeks. After 12 to 15 days, the HCG hormone reaches a detectable level.

When to consult a healthcare professional

Feel free to consult with a healthcare provider right away if you’re at risk of becoming pregnant or acquiring an STI. 

When used as early as possible, preventive measures like an EC and PEP are more effective.

If your healthcare provider deems it necessary, STI testing should be done at the most convenient time.

Conclusion

Most methods of birth control are effective at preventing pregnancy even with typical use, which accounts for the occasional screw-up.

Don't let any doubts ruin your birth control, so throw a second method into the mix—a barrier, or simply stick with non-penetrative methods.

If you have difficulty staying consistent, consider seeking advice from a healthcare professional regarding other options.


Post a Comment

0 Comments